top of page

Rightwing NZ government accused of ‘war on nature’ as it takes axe to climate policies

Our latest selection of articles from New Zealand and around the world on environmental management and sustainability. Click here to subscribe.


Recent commentary on the NZ Coalition Government’s environmental governance has focused on the idea that the NZ’s policy responses have been a war on nature, but given where many of these funding or capability cuts have impacted, a common feature is to reduce the role of data and science in environmental decision making.


 

Climate change is though now mainstream big business as solar is being installed at a phenomenal rate and along with wind turbines, both technologies are increasingly demonstrating their commercial and environmental advantages in a carbon-constrained future. Emissions reductions from transport are often at the heart of reducing our carbon footprints which extends to the choices we make with sea freight logistics and sharing those benefits throughout the value chain but also to considering if it is even safe to travel some airline routes due to climate change.

 

Pressure for change is also coming through increased public support for climate litigation and legal action for GHG emissions through international treaties, which begins to address the climate inequity between those nations primarily responsible for climate change and those often lesser developed countries, who are on the front line of the worst impacts of the developed world's growth.


Looking for a software tool to measure and reduce your emissions? We've got tips to help you choose.



Here is the full list of articles...


Last week the Coalition Government passed its first budget and the international reception was swift, with The Guardian labelling it as a “war on nature”, after sweeping cuts to climate action projects without any significant new investments in environmental protection, or climate crisis-related policies.  Critics have said the government’s approach to protecting the environment and tackling climate change was backward-looking, while climate resilience projects were the ambulance at the bottom of the cliff without future-facing climate mitigation plans.  In other words, a climate failure.  Read more…


Russel Norman from Greenpeace was more damning on the Coalition Government, highlighting how political donations from seabed mining companies has led to legislation like the Fast track Approvals Bill, whereby those same seabed companies are likely to be granted 35-year leases to extract minerals from ecologically fragile undersea environments, without regard for lasting ecological damage, or the concerns of environmental groups, councils, locals or iwi.  Greenpeace also highlighted the dismantling of freshwater protections, a lower emphasis on biodiversity and expanded road construction over public transport.  Read more…


Humanity’s survival is still within our grasp – just. But only if we take these radical steps. The actions of our current government pull us further away from our climate and biodiversity commitments. However, these commitments are still within reach. To grasp it, we must embark on a radical journey encompassing an essential “4R planet pathway”. This means reducing emissions; removing the excess greenhouse gases already in the atmosphere; repairing ecosystems; and strengthening local and global resilience against inevitable climate impacts. As we face our self-inflicted set of global challenges, the time is now for a significant cultural transformation that will drive action.  Read more…


One significant area for change that can drive positive feedback is climate litigation, which is starting to see support grow in the US. Asked if fossil fuel companies “should be held legally accountable for their contributions to climate change”, 62% of voters said yes, suggesting majority support for the existing civil lawsuits against oil companies. Additionally, almost half of respondents back the filing of criminal charges against oil companies that have contributed to the climate crisis.   Read more…


Experts urge a new climate action narrative focusing on positive stories to inspire change. Despite exceeding the 1.5°C warming limit for 10 months, continued efforts can minimise further warming. Current corporate goals may be flawed, neglecting supply chain emissions and relying on unreliable offsets. Emphasising successful initiatives can motivate communities and individuals. While temporary breaches aren't failures, the urgency for climate action remains. Framing climate goals in relatable ways, highlighting impacts on daily lives, and showcasing innovation can drive meaningful progress. Read more…



In 2023, solar PV and wind comprised about 80% of global generation capacity additions (and 99% in Australia). This is compelling market-based evidence that solar PV and wind are the best options for new generation capacity. Cumulative global installed solar capacity passed 1.4 Terawatts (TW) which is tenfold larger than ten years ago, and it is doubling every 3 years. Global solar capacity surpassed nuclear-installed capacity in 2017; wind in 2022; and hydro in 2023. Read more…


Wind turbines in New Zealand pay back their lifecycle carbon emissions after just 1.5 years of operation, researchers from Victoria University in Wellington have found. Data from a Hawkes Bay wind farm covering everything from making individual turbine parts, transporting, and decommissioning compared that to combined cycle gas turbines. researchers also found that it takes a wind turbine just six months to generate the equivalent of all of the energy required to make it, set it up, and take it down at the end of its life. Read more…


The 'Blue Visby Solution' significantly reduces cargo ship emissions by adjusting speed and timing, eliminating the "sail fast, then wait" practice. Without modifying ships, this method reduces fuel consumption and emissions by 17.3% on average, as shown in recent trials. By arriving just in time at ports, ships avoid unnecessary idling, cut hydrodynamic drag, and maintain delivery schedules. This strategy requires global coordination and a benefit-sharing system, promising major environmental and operational benefits without extensive technological changes. Read more…


We are living in one of the safest periods in aviation history, although given recent events it might not feel that way. Nervous fliers might feel hesitant about stepping into a high-velocity, pressurised tin can on a normal day, but should one be concerned that air travel is becoming more dangerous? The answer is complicated. So, fasten your seat belt and prepare to meet the host of challenges facing the modern aviation industry. Featuring a familiar foe, climate change, and its relationship with an increasingly frequent phenomenon: clear air turbulence. Read more…



Does the release of known greenhouse gases (GHGs) qualify as marine pollution? In a landmark ruling, the International Tribunal for the Law of the Sea says yes. The case, first presented by small island nations in 2022, sought to hold all 169 parties to the UN Convention on the Law of Sea accountable for their GHG emissions under the treaty’s definition of marine pollution. The case heralds a higher regard for scientific consensus in international law and paves the way for developing countries to self-advocate for climate justice through pre-existing frameworks. Read more…




This week we have the following innovation articles we hope you find interesting:





Hydrology Report - 6 June 2024




Electricity Price Index - 6 June 2024







Click here to subscribe to SnippETS 


Did you know: You can display your organisation’s sustainability data on your website or intranet using our carbon management software, e-Bench? Read more…


Copyright of all featured articles lies with the original authors

Comentários


Featured Posts
SnippETS Newsletter

Your information is 100% secure with us and will not be shared with any third parties. Click here to read our privacy policy.

bottom of page