top of page

Temperature rises above Paris Agreement’s 1.5C for first time

Our latest selection of articles from New Zealand and around the world on environmental management and sustainability. Click here to subscribe.


Welcome to another issue of SnippETS, where we again showcase a number of interesting developments in the sustainability and climate change space.


The global climate is at a pivotal juncture, with alarming evidence revealing the harsh reality of our continuing impact on the planet. Recent data from the European Union’s Copernicus Agency marks a sobering milestone as the average 12-month global temperature surpasses the Paris Agreement's 1.5°C threshold for the first time.

 

Despite these challenges, there certainly is hope, especially in the realm of renewable energy. BloombergNEF's report highlights a remarkable surge in global clean energy investment, reaching $US1.77 trillion in 2023, a 17% increase from the previous year. China, a major player in this transition, saw clean energy emerge as a significant driver of economic growth, rivaling investments in fossil fuels.

 

Yet, the transition to clean energy still faces hurdles, as illustrated by Nat Bullard's comprehensive analysis of the global electric vehicle (EV) landscape. While governmental policies aim to phase out internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles, the automotive industry's efforts fall behind, with legacy car manufacturers found to be greater polluters than even Big Oil companies. Challenges also persist within the EV sector, particularly concerning battery repair and safety standards.


Meanwhile in New Zealand, grassroots efforts, exemplified by climate activist Mike Smith's legal battle against major carbon emitters, accentuate the importance of individual and collective action in holding polluters accountable.

 

Education also emerges as a critical tool in shaping our sustainable future, with initiatives like Forest Schools empowering young minds to appreciate and protect the natural world.

 

Another positive initiative - Earth Aid Live, led by Live Aid promoter Harvey Goldsmith, aims to inspire global action on the climate crisis through multi-year concert events spanning continents, both in physical and virtual realms.

 

Ultimately, navigating the climate crisis requires a multifaceted approach, blending technological innovation, legal action, cultural initiatives, and educational reform. As Jane Goodall announces there is an urgent need for the combination of hope, inspiration, and action in steering towards a more sustainable and resilient future together. So, let's get on with it!


Looking for a software tool to measure and reduce your emissions? We've got tips to help you choose.



Here is the full list of articles...


In sobering news, the average 12-month global temperature has risen above the Paris Agreement threshold of 1.5C for the first time ever, according to the European Union’s Copernicus Agency. It is yet another reminder of the profound changes we’ve already made to our global climate. January 2024 was the eighth month in a row to become the warmest on record, while 2023 was the hottest year on record, with temperatures exceeding those of any period in at least the last 100,000 years. Read more…


A new report by energy analysts BloombergNEF (BNEF) shows last year brought new records for global renewable energy investment even as China, the world’s largest renewables market recorded an 11% drop. Energy transition investment spending grew 17% last year, but it needs to grow more than 170% if we are to get on track for net zero in the coming years. Read more…



Chinese investment in clean energy - particularly solar power, electric vehicles (EVs) and batteries - was almost as large as the investment in fossil fuels during 2023. The sector was also the top contributor to China’s economic growth overall, contributing around 40 per cent of the year-on-year increase in GDP across all sectors, while other sectors shrank. Read more…



Climate and clean-tech researcher Nat Bullard has published 200 charts on Twitter global government EV policies EV battery manufacturing, EV uptake and global EV public charging capacity. The data indicates that while 60% of governments have policies to ban or phase out ICE vehicles, their ambition significantly lags behind automotive company transition plans. Read more…



A new report has found legacy car companies are significantly underestimating the lifetime emissions of their internal combustion engine vehicles. Car makers are on average more carbon intensive than oil companies! The report finds that when scope 3 emissions are included, some automotive companies generate more emissions than entire G7 economies. The CO2 emissions from Toyota, Volkswagen and Stellantis combined are higher than the sum total emissions of the UK, France, and Italy. Legacy car manufacturers were on average 18% more emissions intensive than investments in oil companies! Read more…


EV’s aren’t so carbon intensive over the course of their operating life, challenges with battery repairs are holding the industry back. Batteries are made in different ways, but all can contain hundreds to thousands of individual cells, which are often packaged into “modules,” and from there, bundled into a battery pack. A bad cell can mean a complete battery needs to be replaced at high cost. If batteries were constructed to an industry standard and were made to be repaired easily and safely it could transform EV ownership. Read more…


Closer to home, Climate activist Mike Smith has won the right to proceed with a court hearing against seven of New Zealand’s largest carbon emitters, after the Supreme Court judgement that a business “must take responsibility for its contribution” to a widespread problem impacting the public.  The defendants are coalminer BT Mining, oil importer Channel Infrastructure, farming company Dairy Holdings, dairy giant Fonterra, energy company Genesis, NZ Steel and petrol and diesel retailer Z Energy.  Smith’s goal is to get the court to order the companies to reduce their polluting activities. Read more…


If the promising advances in renewable energy investment and climate activism show us anything, it’s that hope, inspiration and action will play a large role in ensuring 1.5°C of long-term temperature change doesn’t happen. We can drive hope with innovative technological solutions such as the acceleration of renewable energy uptake. We can drive the human spirit and action through seeing people achieve the seemingly impossible. These sustainable narratives will help us navigate towards hope and give us the will to save the world. Read more…


We must inspire hope and empower the next generation to find a collaborative approach to protecting nature, animals, and our communities. This can start by educating our youth in outdoor settings such as forest schools, which empower them to be resilient, confident and to have empathy for the natural environment. In these times of climate change, energy crises and plastic proliferation, early awareness of the need to understand and protect nature by younger generations is imperative. Inspiring awe and wonder in the natural world might do just that.  Read more…


And lastly, in another move to spur action on the climate crisis, Harvey Goldsmith, the concert promoter who backed the London leg of Live Aid as well as numerous other charity events and major gigs, has announced a new multi-year project: Earth Aid Live, which will take place in six countries across five continents in August 2025, including London, Los Angeles and Rio de Janeiro. Goldsmith is planning similar events in 2030 and 2035 and will feature concerts in the metaverse as well as real life.   Read more…





This week we have the following innovation articles we hope you find interesting:





Hydrology Report - 15 February 2024



Electricity Price Index - 15 February 2024







Click here to subscribe to SnippETS


Did you know: You can display your organisation’s sustainability data on your website or intranet using our carbon management software, e-Bench? Read more…



Copyright of all featured articles lies with the original authors

Comments


Featured Posts
SnippETS Newsletter

Your information is 100% secure with us and will not be shared with any third parties. Click here to read our privacy policy.

bottom of page